President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument

Abraham Lincoln Cottage-Sherman-Tower

President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument, Washington, D.C.

During the “heated season,” President Abraham Lincoln rode his horse home—alone—from the White House to his summer residence at the Cottage at the Soldiers’ Home. While there, Lincoln took time to read outside, under a “magnificent copper beech tree [which was] still growing at the site” when President Clinton established this national monument in 2000. Viewed from the present-day perspective of instant communications and endless news cycles, one could wonder: Where was the press? Where were the paparazzi? And when did the Secret Service make the scene?

“On his daily rides between the Cottage and the White House – a trip he often made alone – Lincoln watched as the war transformed the nation’s capital.”

“The President, during the heated season, occupies a country house near the Soldiers’ Home, two or three miles from the city. He goes to and from that place on horseback, night and morning, unguarded.” [1862]

More information about Abraham Lincoln and the President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument in Washington, D.C. (Proclamation No. 7329, 65 Fed. Reg. 43673, July 7, 2000) is available at the following sources:

For quotes and full text of President Clinton’s national monument proclamation, see:

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2000-07-13/pdf/00-17979.pdf

For the National Park Service’s web site, see:

http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/presidents/lincoln_cottage.html

For quotes and more from the National Trust for Historic Preservation and affiliates web site, see:

http://lincolncottage.org/the-cottage/#more-3734

For a related Abraham Lincoln story regarding the cottage, please see:

http://lincolncottage.org/thats-a-cottage/

For a related Abraham Lincoln story regarding his life and work while at the cottage, please see:

http://lincolncottage.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/LincolnFlagRelease-Apr2011.pdf

Image and quoted material from the Government Printing Office and the National Trust for Historic Preservation—reused here for informational purposes only.

 

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